GLASS TILE COME-BACK

Glass tile was extremely popular in the beginning of this century, and it was also extremely expensive. I lost interest in glass tile for some time, as it was used too much and too frequently. Recently, however, I started noticing it again and feel inspired by some of the products I found. Some of my selections are still expensive, but others are quiet reasonably priced. In either case, please use responsibly…

Glassworks by Original Style.

Glassworks by Original Style.

Blue Lenticular Glass Wall Tile by Glass Tile USA

Metallic Green Lenticular Glass Wall Tile by Glass Tile USA

Metallic Red Lenticular Glass Wall Tile by Glass Tile USA

Lenticular Glass Wall Tiles by Glass Tile USA

Emerald Forest glass slab from Coverings Etc.

Oriental Jade glass slab from Coverings Etc.

Glass slabs from Coverings Etc.

Ogari Silk Mini Brick Stacked by Stone & Pewter Accessories.

Ogari Silk Mini Brick Stacked by Stone & Pewter Accessories.

Block Party by Glas Tile.

For a splash of color: Block Party by Glas Tile.

For a splash of color: Block Party by Glas Tile.

TRAILER TRASH, NOT

1955 Spartan aluminum trailer, lined with reclaimed redwood, sporting a very appropriate steel tiled bathroom with steel bathtub. See the entire trailer interior at Remodelista and read the full story by Meyer Rus at LA Times.

Jane Hallworth's trailer

Interior designer Jane Hallworth’s 1955 Spartan aluminum trailer.

Jane Hallworth's trailer bathroom

Jane Hallworth's trailer bathroom.

THE MANY FLAVORS OF BATH TUBS

Wood, metal, plastic, stone, geometric and organic just to name a few.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Die Wanne, a slate tub from Swiss designer Spallo Kolb found via Remodelista.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Patricia Urquiola's Vieques Tub for Agape found via Remodelista.

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

RENOVATION DOS AND DON’TS

Renovating your bathroom (or your entire apartment) can be exciting.  It can also be exasperating.  Often it is both.

We put together a list of good ideas to implement and bad ideas to avoid during your renovation process.  We hope that this advice will make your remodel more fun and less hassle.

Ladder and contrauction material in painted room.

DO:

+ Price your renovation with at least three contractors. Even if you have a contractor that you know and trust, it is a good idea to get pricing from the competition.  Not only will this be  helpful in your contract negotiations; each contractor may give you some good ideas about cost savings or technical advice.

+ Sign a contract with your builder. Put at least the following in writing: the names and addresses of both parties, the location and scope of the project, the renovation cost and renovation schedule.

+ Order all materials and fixtures prior to commencement of renovation.  Or have your contractor do it for you.  Some items may have very long delivery times – it is beneficial to know about it upfront to avoid delays or last-minute changes.

+ Request samples of materials.   This way you can make sure that you will be getting the product you imagined or be certain that two materials match one another.

+ Inspect the work.  Even if you are not a professional, you may notice issues that the contractor missed.  Address mistakes and problems as soon as you notice them.

DON’T:

- Expect that you can avoid problems.  Problems are inevitable, so be prepared, do not panic and approach them with a clear head.

- Make last-minute changes.  Changes made during the construction is in progress tend to be expensive and may lead to mistakes and/or delays.

- Pay your contractor for work up-front.  Only pay for work that has been completed by the contractor and inspected by you.

Find more renovation advice in the Renovation Tips page of our Web site.  We also recommend you explore our entire Additional Resources section for more useful information regarding apartment remodeling.

THE RECESS LAV

The Recess Lav is a design cooperation between Desai / Chia and AF New York Design Lab.   It is a wonderful solution for small bathrooms.  It is a unit that contains a washbasin, backsplash and medicine cabinets.  Part of the washbasin is recessed into the wall, so the unit projects a mere 12 inches into the space.  The module is seamlessly cast from white resin.

This design won the 2010 Good Design Award and the 2010 Idea bronze Award.

Found via apartmenttherapy.com.

AF Design Lab_Recess Lav

AF Design Lab_Recess Lav

BEYOND TILES: GORGEOUS BATHROOMS, VIBRANT COLORS.

Who says we must use tiles in bathrooms?  In areas that are not directly exposed to water it is perfectly fine to use appropriate paint or wood. The few photographs below show some fantastic examples of how to create drama with color.

WHO SAYS POO IS TABOO?

2.6 billion people in the world lack any form of functional toilet, and humans create an average of two pounds of excretion per person per day.
In the first episode of Dwell’s new video series, The Bathroom Reinvented (warning: there is a short ad in the beginning), Virginia Gardiner makes a case for talking candidly about the can, explaining the designer’s role in improving the loo. She turns poo into fuel!

Virginia Gardiner explaining "the loowatt system".

QUADRO OCEAN FAUCET LINE

I recently came across this beautiful line of bathroom fixtures designed by Danish designer Hans Thyge Raunkjaer for Quadro.  The line is called “Ocean” and is inspired by the ocean, although the analogy is very abstract.  On the Web site the designer states: “Ocean is the powerful sea and the rolling waves”.  The geometric shapes indeed make a strong statement and the handles are round, but not very “wavy”.  However close the objects may be to their inspiration, it is a gorgeous series.

Hans Thyge Raunkjaer for QUADRO: Ocean faucet.

Hans Thyge Raunkjaer for QUADRO: Ocean deck mounted faucet.

Hans Thyge Raunkjaer for QUADRO: Ocean faucet.

Hans Thyge Raunkjaer for QUADRO: Ocean wall mounted faucet.

Hans Thyge Raunkjaer for QUADRO: Ocean shower set.

Hans Thyge Raunkjaer for QUADRO: Ocean shower set.

Hans Thyge Raunkjaer's studio.

Now here is the best part.  The above faucet line (along with many other creations by Hans Thyge) was conceived in this unbelievably beautiful “studio”.   The studio was designed by owner Hans Thyge Raunkjaer and architect Claus Hermansen in 2007.  It is located in the village of Norsminde, on the east coast of Jutland.  You can check out more photos here: http://hansthyge.dk/the-studio. One more reason to move to Denmark!

 

MINIMAL BATHROOMS

I would like to share with you some bathroom images that simply struck me – in a very pleasant way.  You might wonder why I keep returning to the subject of minimal bathrooms.  The critique of minimalism is that it is too serene, too sterile, not “real life”.  I agree in the sense that the images below are styled, and lack the human touch as well as the human body.  What is missing are those toothbrushes, half-empty toothpaste tubes, shampoo and shower gel in unsightly bottle , messy towels, razors… do I need to go on?   I argue that minimal bathrooms work for precisely this reason: they do not by themselves add to the clutter.  They create a vary subtle yet beautiful backdrop for the daily life objects and for the human body.  With this in mind lets indulge in the beauty of the following photographs.

Bathroom in Gama Issa House, São Paulo, Brasil, designed by Marcio Kogan.

Bathroom in Gama Issa House, São Paulo, Brasil, designed by Marcio Kogan.

Minimal shower, styled by Agape.

Minimal shower, styled by Agape.

Pawson House bathroom, London, UK, designed by John Pawson.

Pawson House bathroom, London, UK, designed by John Pawson.

Tilty Barn bathroom, Essex, UK, designed by John Pawson.

Tilty Barn bathroom, Essex, UK, designed by John Pawson.

Minimal bathroom, location and designer unknown.

I love this bathroom but I do not know where it is located or who designed it. If you do, please drop me a line.

Latis bathtub by Omvivo.

Latis bathtub by Omvivo.

Another unidentified minimal bathroom.

Another unidentified minimal bathroom.

TOWNHOUSE 1 BACKSTORY

The classic interior of a townhouse never gets old. It’s been around for centuries and we still find it elegant and enviable. The classic carrara, arabescato or calacatta marble paired with oak or walnut is beautifully familiar. We think that the use of these traditional materials by means of modern vocabulary makes a grand effect, even in our 5’ x 7’ Townhouse series. Below you will find inspiring images of some of the finest-looking townhouse spaces around.

Townhouse 1 visualization

Sabine and Michael Maharam NYC apartment

Sabina and Michael Maharam NYC apartment

India Mahdavi Paris apartment.

Modern tub in a classic interior.

Modern townhouse bath in Brooklyn Heights found via Remodelista.

Modern Brooklyn Heights townhouse found via Remodelista.